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‘Racist’ Chocolate Easter Ducks Pulled From Shelves

British supermarket chain Waitrose is in hot water after branding chocolate Easter ducks in a manner many found racist.

The collection of three featured a milk chocolate duck named “Crispy,” a white chocolate (or yellow one, really) called “Fluffy,” and a dark chocolate one named, uh, “Ugly.”

A Twitter user shared her concern in March, after seeing the ducks for sale and overhearing other customers complaining.

The names of the ducks are said to have been inspired by Danish author Hans Christian Anderson’s children’s story The Ugly Duckling. However, in 2019, that connection will likely fly over customers’ heads as they shop for Easter candy. Also, the “ugly duckling” has traditionally been described as gray in color before realizing she was a beautiful swan, not dark brown.

Many did not understand how this mistake could have happened. 

Waitrose has heard the feedback and removed the ducks from its aisles a few weeks ago. The chain also apologized in a statement emailed to the Daily Dot.

“We are very sorry for any upset caused by the name of this product, it was absolutely not our intention to cause any offence,” Waitrose said. “We removed the product from sale several weeks ago while we changed the labelling and our ducklings are now back on sale.”   

Meanwhile, Twitter user Livia A. Aliberti, who first called out the supermarket chain, has faced a flurry of backlash. Beyond the usual comments shitting on “political correctness,” some said her complaint was making light of other, more complex issues of racism.

While it may appear trivial to some, perhaps that is both the point and the problem: Racism is present even in the simplest, everyday things and that infiltrates into much bigger, more obvious, possibly violent things. None of it needs to be normalized.

This post originally appeared on The Daily Dot.

Daily Dot

Written by Daily Dot

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